PART 2 Mini-survey #MuseumTickets: What do museum visitors do with admission tickets?

Museumtickets_title2

This is part 2 of the results of a small online survey, carried out by Anna Mikhaylova (@Madlena_P), currently PhD student in museum studies at Leicester University, and me (@MH_TextWeb), journalist with optional degree in museum management from Hamburg University (Read part 1 here).

Basically, we asked our followers on Twitter to answer a view questions on their use of museum tickets. The goal was to find out, which information on museum tickets is most important for museums and visitors. We share the results of this not-representative little survey with you on our blogs (here your find Annas blog “Ideas for museums”).

Our survey was answered by 20 museum visitors. That’s not representative, but maybe it can give us inspiration.

How a museum ticket should NOT look like

Through our Storify on the subject we already found some people, who collected museum tickets and who shared some nice examples with us online. First of all, people shared examples of how museum tickets should not look like – what proofs that museums should care about their ticket design, because it can be bad advertisement as well.

Peter Soemers shared a ticket for a special exhibition in the Hamburger Kunsthalle, which does not tell the museum’s name and address.

Collecting museum tickets

One of our questions to museum visitors was, if they collect tickets (and why). Surprisingly half of the people, who answered our survey, did – to have them as memories of their holidays / trips (said 9 of 10 who collected tickets), to keep information they find useful in some way (4 out of 10), just because they like collecting tickets or to document their museum visits.

Important parts of a museum ticket

Our second question was, which parts of museum tickets visitors find most important (design, content, both, other). While 9 out of 20 think, design and content are equally important, five people were more interested in good design and another five in interesting content like name, date, place/ exhibition. One was more interested in paperless tickets without wasting paper and money.

Inspiration: What museum visitors appreciate

We got some comments by museum visitors, which we find quite interesting: One person suggested that she finds it extra exciting, when a museum ticket provides some special information or additional useful content – like a coupon, a map of the museum or the exhibition. Another visitor wrote that she prefers different / shifting pictures on the museums tickets, because she uses to visit some museums more than once. And a third says that he does not collect them, but does not throw them away immediately either. – While another visitor writes that he never gives museum tickets a thought at all.

Visitors remember museum tickets which provide something special:

A waste of paper?

One visitor confessed that she was collecting tickets earlier, but found out that she years later does not gain neither information nor memories from hoarding them. She writes: “Practically speaking, I’ve found in nearly every visit at 152 museums, the paper ticket is redundant. It is never checked by staff after payment at entry. It really does seem like a waste of paper (and money put into producing them). I carry the ticket during my visit but never refer to it. The only ticket I’ve paid heed to this year was at the Chocolate Museum, where the tickets were chocolate bars. I promptly ate it and then the wrapper thrown out. But it did significantly contribute to my museum experience. Unfortunately, I feel paper tickets, especially in this age of excess waste and digital everything, are becoming impractical. I’m not sure that sentimentality is a good enough reason to keep museum tickets in the face of these competing forces. I think the Met Museum ceasing production of their badges this year, in favor of disposable stickers, might be an indicator of this.”

Talking to museums, the paper ticket has another important function, which is not relevant for the visitor: to count visitors and to manage the museum’s book keeping. So stickers could be an alternative to waste less paper.

For museums: If you have paper tickets, use them for marketing!

My overall impression was that most museums still use paper tickets and many visitors keep those – at least a while. So why not use them to promote the next events, special exhibitions, the website, blog and social media sites? Make the ticket useful for the visitors, for example by giving discount on something in the museum shop / café, museum events and activities or providing a download link to something special on your web page.

Last, but not least, we want to thank all museum visitors and museums who took part in our survey! – You made this short analysis possible.

Click here to read our Storify on #Museumtickets discussions on Twitter

(Published: December 11th 2013)

Museumtickets_title2

This is part 2 of the results of a small online survey, carried out by Anna Mikhaylova (@Madlena_P), currently PhD student in museum studies at Leicester University, and me (@MH_TextWeb), journalist with optional degree in museum management from Hamburg University (Read part 1 here).

Basically, we asked our followers on Twitter to answer a view questions on their use of museum tickets. The goal was to find out, which information on museum tickets is most important for museums and visitors. We share the results of this not-representative little survey with you on our blogs (here your find Annas blog “Ideas for museums”).

Our survey was answered by 20 museum visitors. That’s not representative, but maybe it can give us inspiration.

How a museum ticket should NOT look like

Through our Storify on the subject we already found some people, who collected museum tickets and who shared some nice examples with us online. First of all, people shared examples of how museum tickets should not look like – what proofs that museums should care about their ticket design, because it can be bad advertisement as well.

Peter Soemers shared a ticket for a special exhibition in the Hamburger Kunsthalle, which does not tell the museum’s name and address.

Collecting museum tickets

One of our questions to museum visitors was, if they collect tickets (and why). Surprisingly half of the people, who answered our survey, did – to have them as memories of their holidays / trips (said 9 of 10 who collected tickets), to keep information they find useful in some way (4 out of 10), just because they like collecting tickets or to document their museum visits.

Important parts of a museum ticket

Our second question was, which parts of museum tickets visitors find most important (design, content, both, other). While 9 out of 20 think, design and content are equally important, five people were more interested in good design and another five in interesting content like name, date, place/ exhibition. One was more interested in paperless tickets without wasting paper and money.

Inspiration: What museum visitors appreciate

We got some comments by museum visitors, which we find quite interesting: One person suggested that she finds it extra exciting, when a museum ticket provides some special information or additional useful content – like a coupon, a map of the museum or the exhibition. Another visitor wrote that she prefers different / shifting pictures on the museums tickets, because she uses to visit some museums more than once. And a third says that he does not collect them, but does not throw them away immediately either. – While another visitor writes that he never gives museum tickets a thought at all.

Visitors remember museum tickets which provide something special:

A waste of paper?

One visitor confessed that she was collecting tickets earlier, but found out that she years later does not gain neither information nor memories from hoarding them. She writes: “Practically speaking, I’ve found in nearly every visit at 152 museums, the paper ticket is redundant. It is never checked by staff after payment at entry. It really does seem like a waste of paper (and money put into producing them). I carry the ticket during my visit but never refer to it. The only ticket I’ve paid heed to this year was at the Chocolate Museum, where the tickets were chocolate bars. I promptly ate it and then the wrapper thrown out. But it did significantly contribute to my museum experience. Unfortunately, I feel paper tickets, especially in this age of excess waste and digital everything, are becoming impractical. I’m not sure that sentimentality is a good enough reason to keep museum tickets in the face of these competing forces. I think the Met Museum ceasing production of their badges this year, in favor of disposable stickers, might be an indicator of this.”

Talking to museums, the paper ticket has another important function, which is not relevant for the visitor: to count visitors and to manage the museum’s book keeping. So stickers could be an alternative to waste less paper.

For museums: If you have paper tickets, use them for marketing!

My overall impression was that most museums still use paper tickets and many visitors keep those – at least a while. So why not use them to promote the next events, special exhibitions, the website, blog and social media sites? Make the ticket useful for the visitors, for example by giving discount on something in the museum shop / café, museum events and activities or providing a download link to something special on your web page.

Last, but not least, we want to thank all museum visitors and museums who took part in our survey! – You made this short analysis possible.

Click here to read our Storify on #Museumtickets discussions on Twitter

(Published: December 11th 2013)


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